The Knitting Nurse

Rambles and Travels

Let’s Get Caught Up! – Marin on the Water – Kayaking In Sausilito

Leave a comment

There are a few things I’m afraid of I’ll reveal:

 

  • Tornadoes
  • Rattlesnakes
  • Drunk Drivers
  • Earthquakes
Used to be I’d have dreams about tornadoes all the time. Seemed a nightly occurrence.  Usually the plot included me trying to protect a family member from an impending twister coming over an unprotected place.  How’s that for a glimpse into an oldest sister’s brain?
Since I started living in earthquake prone areas quakes have taken center stage.
Seems I sense, while sleeping, the feeling of the building swaying. Often a noise accompanies this suggestive of a quake. Always I acknowledge it in my sleep as feeling REAL, and curious, but stay asleep.  The other AM I looked on the USGS website (see sidebar to the right).  No nocturnal quakes to speak of.  I have a predictable dream pattern.
Let’s add swimming to the list above.
I adore floating around in warm lakes, lounging on an innertube.  But the fact is, I flunked intermediate swimming lessons as a child and stumped my adult swim lesson teacher a couple of years ago.  I just can’t get comfy submerged, swimming  just enough to stay afloat.
Whitewater paddling will never me my friend. Tried it. Panicked during the “wet exit” portion of the lesson.
A leisurely paddle on a sit-on-top kayak, though, I enjoy.  I’m building confidence.
There’s a travel nurse at the hospital I work at who is a MN gal.  It’s her first travel job.  We’ve been hiking and decided to go paddle together.  Megan and I rented kayaks in Sausilito and set out to see the famed Sausilito Houseboats.
The boats are basic. Stable. Yay!
This funky boat guards the entrance to the first ‘neighborhood’ of houseboats:
Some 400 houseboats are here.  Sausilito was a WW2 haven for boat building.   Abandoned/decommissioned boats were claimed  and lived upon. This created tensions regarding sanitation and property rights.  Approved docks became homes for the anchored-out boats. I found this snipped on Wikipedia that I find humerous, rolling my eyes re: government red-tape:
“When Sausalito was formally platted, it was anticipated that future development might extend the shoreline with landfill, as had been the practice in neighboring San Francisco. As a result entire streets, demarcated and given names like Pescadero, Eureka and Teutonia, remain beneath the surface of Richardson Bay.[4] The legal, if not actual, presence of these streets has proved a contentious factor in public policy, because some houseboats float directly above them. According to the San FranciscoChronicle, “State agencies say privately owned houseboats can’t be located above the underwater streets because the streets are public trust lands intended for public benefit.” The California State Lands Commission is reportedly pursuing a compromise which would move not the houseboats, but the theoretical streets instead.[5]
Megan enters a neighborhood. The water is calm.  The sun was bright. It was a gorgeous day! How I love my work schedule.  A free week-day, crowdless, to play.
Some houseboats are literally boats, rough, simple:
Others whimsical:
Some are more McMansion than quaint.  All are connected via a mass of docks.  Boats are tethered outside the tiny footprint that resident occupies.
I think it would be a novel place to live.  But you’d be staring into oodles of neighbors homes all days.  The noise of (non-rush-hour) highway 101 was loud.  Perhaps, as a vacation rental, it would be a cool experience?
Seals at a harbor on the way back:
I’ll return for more!  But this time I’ll remember bike gloves to protect my palms and to sunscreen BOTH my feet. Though I covered up and bathed in the goo, I forgot to coat my left foot and sustained a bad burn to the top of my foot.  We’re talking a no shoe wearing for a day burn.  :  (

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s