The Knitting Nurse

Rambles and Travels


1 Comment

Mt. Baker: Heliotrope Ridge Hike

August 2017 – yes way back then – I took a long weekend trip to get back to the Cascades. It’d been two years.

Day one I chose a trail that was too busy for my taste but fit the required logistics.  In 6 miles or so round trip I was able to perch above the Coleman glacier and be nose to nose with Mt. Baker  via flower studded meadows. During my last visit to Mt. Baker she was shy and stayed shrouded in clouds the entire time.

Not this time.

img_6097

I was itching for views that go on for miles and miles and I found them.  Numerous small streams were crossed.

img_6161

The views opened up and meadows were found.

There is one helluva obstacle on this hike.  Heliotrope Creek must be forded. I mustered up some vitamin-brave to do so. The water was swift and icy-cold.  Someone had strung a safety line across. It was handy but I did not rely on it fully not knowing its strength or condition. Poles were helpful.

The water to my knees, across I went. I yelped in icy pain. It was scary. But I made it. Looking up the creek:

img_6108

It took some time to get the feeling back into my feet.

It was so worth it.

Today, the sky was bluebird clear. There she is! So thrilling!  And how about that flower-studded meadow?

I believe the fuchsia pink flower on the right and above is Red Willowherb and the orange one might be a saxifrage.

Selfie.

A climbers trail to summit Mt. Baker is way off to the right of this frame. While stopped on the ridge overlooking the glacier I could see dots of people moving upward. Mt. Baker is 10, 781′ tall.

Water and glacier sculpted rock ran with rivulets of water were everywhere.  So lush!

img_6120

Pearly Everlasting?

Pink Monkey flower. I think.

My end goal was a picnic perch on the flank of the Coleman Glacier. There were people climbing it, looking like ants from my perspective. Note I’m not referring to the buffoons below me loudly carrying on. Some people are clueless when outdoors.

Isn’t the mountain striking?

Glacial ice:

Some sort of thistle?

A lovely yellow flower that looks like the 100’s of other yellow flowers in my plant book.

Cow Parsnip. I think.  I’m taking a stab at plant names using several guide books.

Here’s one of my favorites, lupine. My last trip up here was in 9/15 and it was a frightfully low snow pack year. The lupines and other usual flowers were long done (water starved) or barely bloomed before I arrived.

I was glad to catch some this time. I’ll show you more in the next post of this series.

SaveSave


Leave a comment

On and Off the Needles

Project catch up:

A big box o’love I mailed to my sis last week. Would you like a peek inside?

Have you knit the Tomten by Elizabeth Zimmerman? It’s brilliant!  I used up many beloved odds n ends as well as two skeins of yarn from my northern CA days, Windrush Farms yarn from Mimi. This is a modular, all garter stitch pattern. Sonja will look adorable and ever bit the mischievous, impish wee one in that hood. Notes can be found on my Ravelry project page.

A quickie Husky quilt goes to Sonja from fabric her mom sent me.  This is my third time sewing this pattern. Super fast! Love it.

A Pumpkin hat went in for my nephew Chris because hey, babies get that sort of thing.

For a baby on the way I crafted up an apple hat. The leaves I winged.

You may know I’ve gone back to school and knitting time is at a premium. I need simple, can knit it while not looking sorts of projects.  This is The Big Easy in Manos Maxima a merino single that is knit underwear out of it soft.  I like the deep brim and it’s the perfect amount of slouchy.

The color is more accurate in this pic. Most knitting is done at night with Jane in my lap these days.

I also started Alieas, a cardigan by Isabelle Kraemer in a wooly-wool I bought at Madrona last February from Island Fibers of Lopez Island. Loving it so far and I’m much further that this pic shows. Top down, I got to the bust and decided horizontal bust darts are needed to provide some length to accomodate the girls to keep the sweater length in the front correct.  I read somewhere that it is a good idea to get sleeves in before doing so as that will greatly change the fit on the shoulders and front. I’ve got one sleeve zooming along (really love knitting a sleeve using the short row top down technique).  I put it on last night and the neckline and back width are perfect.  I’ve done bust dart calculations per Ysolda Teague’s Little Red in the City book and will insert and con’t the body after I’ve done both sleeves.

This is my first Isabelle Kraemer pattern and it is meticulously written and clear. I adore her designs and have several fav’ed and queued. There is a mock cable on the fronts, the underarm and sides and hem that are a special detail.

Can’t wait to finish this and make another sweater!  I’m in a sweater making mode…


2 Comments

September Sewing Projects

I have a couple quickie sewing projects to share with you from September.

A quilted set of four placemats and napkins joined the pile of linens. Nothing fancy, each napkin uses 1/2 yard total and as well as each placemat. I make the napkins rectangular to avoid fabric waste if I buy as fat quarters or have fabric in 1/2 or one yard lengths which was the situation here.

I have a thing for yellow and navy.  The matts are a white and yellow print backed straight line quilted. The napkins share the fabric that backed the matts.

A project bag with drawstring I made up as a thank you gift for a friend.  She has a black cat!

Pockets inside to organize:

My sewing room’s become a school work room. Sigh…hopefully I will have time now and then to work on sewing projects.

 

 

SaveSave


Leave a comment

Balanced Stones on the Beach

A sunset walk on the beach worked wonders to soothe my eyes after a day of computer work for school. North Beach, here in town, is a fine place for just that. I started at about 6 o’clock.

Just a hint of a warm glow washed the bluffs and sand.

The sinking sun washed Mt. Baker in a painterly way.

Have you seen a Pacific sunset?

Walking back I noticed something I couldn’t believe I’d missed. Balanced stones, seemingly someone’s calling card, were everywhere.  The glare of the setting sun must have hid them while walking west.

A lesson to be learned?  One may miss the details if looking in one direction only?


Leave a comment

A lovely walk at Anderson Lake State Park

Fall is here. Thank goodness! It’s my favorite season. Gone are the dry, hot days.  I celebrated with a stroll through a local state park that is one of my favorite retreats.

I noticed further out west the other day, towards Port Angeles the maples are changing to yellow. Here, more east, it’s just barely starting. A few yellow leaves lay scattered on the forest floor. This park has grand, noble maples under which I often stand and gawk.

The lake’s been closed to use due to a toxic algae bloom, a shame as it would make for a lovely, quiet paddle. Instead, I enjoy reflections and on this day, cormorant and heron activity from the shore.

This spider built a large web across the trail. I managed a limbo underneath to spare it.

The quiet enclosure of trees was just what I needed.

I’ll bring you golden leaved photos when able—

SaveSave